Engage, Revised and Updated: The Complete Guide for Brands and Businesses to Build, Cultivate, and Measure Success in the New Web Reviews

Engage, Revised and Updated: The Complete Guide for Brands and Businesses to Build, Cultivate, and Measure Success in the New Web

The ultimate guide to branding and building your business in the era of the Social Web?revised and updated with a Foreword by Ashton KutcherEngage! thoroughly examines the social media landscape and how to effectively use social media to succeed in business?one network and one tool at a time. It leads you through the detailed and specific steps required for conceptualizing, implementing, managing, and measuring a social media program. The result is the ability to increase visibility, build commu

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3 Comments

  1. 17 of 19 people found the following review helpful:
    3.0 out of 5 stars
    wish there was more ACTION steps for small companies, June 29, 2010
    By 
    Jacob Versluis “music enthusiast” (Los Angeles, CA United States) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

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    The book clearly explains that we’re in the process of a paradigm shift here regarding marketing/PR and the like. So props for that. I guess I was looking for more of a manual of “how-to’s” in the social media realm. There was some good stuff in here. But as a small business owner I found myself skipping over a fair amount of the pages that were discussing how different departments should respond and what their goals should be. I would say pick this book up if you’re part of a big organization trying to better understand “social media” and you want to find a place for it in your mid to large size company.

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  2. 20 of 24 people found the following review helpful:
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Creating a Social Media Plan to “Engage”, March 23, 2010
    By 
    Marylene Delbourg-Delphis (Palo Alto & Boston) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)

    “Perhaps the biggest mistakes committed by businesses, personalities, and brands in social media occur when people jump into social networks blindly without establishing guidelines, a plan of action, a sense of what people are seeking and how and why they communicated, an understanding of where people are congregating, a definition of what they represent and how they will personify the brand online, and the goals, objectives, and metrics associated with participation.” Albeit fairly late in the book, this sentence sums up the purpose of Brian Solis in Engage! One more book about Social Media, sure; but this one is one of the best written. It’s almost reassuring to read sentences that exceed 140 characters (or twenty words), and, while you can find all the trendy buzzwords and expressions on virtually every page, the author authentically tries to assist social media managers as they transition from the broadcasting age to the intricacies of a new form of netcasting architecture where both users and corporations exchange “social objects.” How well or efficiently can they do so? This book provides social media managers with the background knowledge and practical notions that they can leverage to design a consistent strategy.

    The first half of the book surveys the world of social media in general, describing all the aspects of social interactions and their impact on corporate marketing and communication, as well as customer service departments. Traditional marketing schemas have irreversibly imploded under the pressure of a crowd represented in a “conversation prism” that factors in behavioral guidelines implicitly or explicitly set by the multiple socialization channels. So marketers must listen. What can they do with so much information? “Instead of inhibiting the pace and breadth of information flow, we must channel relevant details and data,” a task that does not only require “attention” (nice reference to Linda Stone’s Continuous Partial Attention), but also some understanding of applied social sciences or researchers’ and analysts’ categorizations (such as Charlene Li’s and Jeremiah Owyang’s Socialgraphics). Achieving a state of the art “unmarketing” to use a time-stamped word by Scott Stratten – i.e. rebuilding a marketing strategy from the bottom up – entails, for many companies, a serious reassessment of some entrenched marketing habits. Hence the resolutely didactic approach of the two parts of the book: “The New Reality of Marketing and Creating Customer Service” and “Forever Students of New Media.”

    The second half of the book comprises four parts that detail the new responsibilities that come up with the potential of social media, and focuses more specifically on what a “new marketing” approach may look like. One of the most remarkable sections is related to “defining the rules of engagement.” It unambiguously shows to the skeptics that the social media revolution is not a passing phenomenon spurred on or controlled by influencers, but the reality of today’s computing, one of the incarnations of the social Web, and that it is set to transform every single company from the inside. The examples of IBM’s and Intel’s guide-lines (and its digital IQ Program) do not only demonstrate the forward-thinking intelligence of people like Bryan Rhoads or Ken Kaplan, but also the proactive approach of highly regarded companies as they define new roles and responsibilities to adapt to a new world. Digital intelligence is not simply the prerogative of a handful of gurus appointed to task forces or advisory boards, it will also be part of the job description of most employees in the close future if they want to be up to par with educated customers. The scope of the book stops here, but it’s clear that the social media revolution will lead to the reassessment of corporate cultures, employee empowerment methodologies, and linguistic and artistic skills. “Unmarketing” just like any vibrant “marketing” starts from within. Corporate stonewalling doesn’t have too much future.

    End result: a serious book that gathers the Zeitgeist (and will bring many people up to speed with trends and idioms). Somewhat voluble, yet kindly extroverted and definitely useful if you want to create a social media plan.

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  3. 9 of 10 people found the following review helpful:
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Engage by Brian Solis (Wiley), April 15, 2010
    By 
    BlogOnBooks “BlogOnBooks” (Los Angeles CA) –

    Much like the de rigueur necessity of having a website a decade ago, it has become increasingly apparent that any company looking to establish a direct connection with their consumers now needs to have a social marketing strategy as well. Yet, with a daily growing array of platforms and tools now available to accomplish such goals, the choices and strategies needed to achieve such relationships can often seem overwhelming at best.

    With a surfeit of so-called social marketing `experts’ now in the marketplace, how can a brand be sure they are getting the best advice and a full understanding of the expanding number of options available to accomplish this mission? Enter Brian Solis. In recent years, Solis has emerged as one of the foremost experts on social marketing. His new book, `Engage! The Complete Guide for Brands and Businesses to Build, Cultivate and Measure Success in the New Web,’ offers a truly comprehensive guide to managing a company’s online brand awareness and customer interaction that is second to none.

    Solis opens the kimono on everything from establishing a company’s initial messaging goals and approach to a deep dig into the tools and platforms currently available to facilitate and evaluate the success of an effective social media campaign. While admitting various brands have different needs, Solis lays out his program like a college curriculum offering fourteen chapters that create the rubric for `The New Media University: 101 to MBA.’

    `Engage’ reveals the best practices for establishing brand identity, reputation, rules of engagement and feedback, both through carefully planned corporate planning as well as through the use of tools ranging from social networks, widgets, feeds and more designed to facilitate the best messaging systems, listening devices and conversational workflows. Solis provides access to a broad array of resources, some so new that they aren’t actually even in full operation yet when we tested their websites!

    At the end of the day, Solis appears to cover every single aspect of social marketing and while the book eventually gets into some very heady stuff regarding feedback metrics, charting and tracking programs, it is clear that this book goes further than any volume we have yet to see on this subject. Whether most companies can keep up with the extensive options Solis presents has yet to be seen. Of course, this new medium is far from a static state and therefore there are clearly more platforms and tools just around the corner (Gowalla, anyone?) For that Solis offers a website to carry on from here. Well done!

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